The Apalachicola Ecosystems Project

2011 Field Season.  During the summer of 2011, Project members Thomas Foster, Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman, Roger Brown, and Chet Walker and students from the University of West Georgia and Columbus State University continued research at Apalachicola.  Learn more ...

 

2009 Field Season.  During the summer of 2009, Thomas Foster and 14 University of West Georgia anthropology students continued research at the Hitchiti town of Apalachicola on the Chattahoochee River in Alabama.  Learn more...

2006 and 2007 Field Season.  Archaeologists from the University of West Georgia, Northern Kentucky University, and Columbus State University (Georgia) teamed together to begin archaeological investigations at the Talwa Thlucco Apalachicola in eastern Alabama.  Learn more...

Cussetuh.  In April 2005, Dr. Thomas Foster led an excavation at the eighteenth century town of Cussetuh as a part of ongoing research at that and other Creek Indian towns.  Learn more...

Apalachicola.  AEP scientists and students are conducting archaeological investigations at the immigrant and emigrant towns of Apalachicola (1715-1836).  Learn more... 

Muscogee Creek Archaeology.  AEP scientist, Thomas Foster, synthesized archaeological data that has been collected over decades on the Muskogee Creek Indian sites along the Chattahoochee and Flint River watersheds.  Learn more...

Palynology.  Palynology is the study of ancient pollen and micro-botanical remains.  AEP researchers are engaged in analysis of paleo botanical remains in order to characterize the ancient environment and understand how humans have used it.  Learn more...

Anthropogenic EcologyA branch of the AEP research is directed toward reconstructing the environment of the past.  AEP scientists are involved in the analysis of ancient macro and micro botanical remains, geographic information systems modeling of environmental data, and reconstruction of ancient land use and topography from historic maps. Learn more...

Ethnohistory.  The AEP also involves ethnohistoric research.  Historic documents and maps are invaluable sources for historical anthropology.  Learn more...

Dendrochronology. 

 

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